Tag: Gamification

When it’s Something Strange, In Hugendubel, Who You Gonna Call?

Bookbuster!

We are proud to present the new Hugendubel campaign with 3 different games connected under 1 concept!

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Bookbuster campaign asks you to play these games either on your mobile or on your desktop and have a chance to be the one who wins 50 book from Hugendubel!

First game is a memory game where you can try out if you are fast enough to match the books. You can click on image below to test your memory:

hugendubel-memory

Second game is a scratch card type quiz game where you have to find the right answer at the right time! Click on image if you would like to test your knowledge:

hugendubel-card

And last but not least, we have the ultimate wordmatch game where you have to find the words which are hidden in the books! You can click below o try your chance but also you probably need the closest Hugendubel store address.

hugendubel-match

 

The campaign is on-air so don’t miss your chance to win 50 free books!

 

Google Loves Gamewheel!

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We are proud to announce that Gamewheel – Burger King partnership has been selected as one of the outstanding “Mobile Moment” case studies by Think with Google!

2016 was quite a successful year both for Burger King and Gamewheel and as the result of this success, we launched 4 gamification campaigns throughout the year.

BK Games

Angriest Whopper, Verlängerung, Summer BBQ and Halloween campaigns individually hit their mission goals, fulfilled and even outperformed the market KPIs!

BK KPIs

If you would like to know more, click below to visit Think with Google’s Mobile Moments (only available in German yet) and don’t forget to check out our Gamification Stories!

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Game Ads: Future of Mobile Game Industry

Today, we’d like to talk about new innovative Playable Game ads advertising formats, which allow game publishers and developers to increase sales by acquiring and re-engaging more loyal players. Such players will spend more time and money on the corresponding game titles, leading to higher marketing effectiveness.

Nowadays, game advertisers try to reach as many users as they can. Also mobile game startups are embracing mobile/social advertising more than ever because according to App Annie, games made up 75 percent of total revenue.

app store revenue by categories

As a result of this effort, we are getting exposed to lot of similar video advertisements of mobile games. So, how mobile game developers are going to differentiate their growth strategy from the crowd?

With Playable Game ads!

Let’s take Mobile Strike as a real world example. It is holding the first rank in a lot of different categories in US market even there are lot of games already exist in the store. It has a visibility score of 81 out of 100 according to MobileAction. But what makes them this successful? The answer of this success lies in their advertisement strategy and Playable Game ads!

As Mobile Strike proved to the world, Playable Game ads are the next big thing following the video ads. It gives brands to tease by showing a mini version of the game and let people play  interactively instead of static videos. This is increasing the engagement and conversion of your mobile ads and contributing to retention by delivering your game’s message clearly.

mobile-strike

But also everyone knows that developing a mini game for an advertisement campaign, with all A/B tests maintaining the compatibility of your ads with lot of ad networks is a huge workforce and a time spending progress.

And this is where Gamewheel comes to scene. Gamewheel Content Creation Platform gives anyone the chance to choose and personalize a game template, brand it and integrate their own playable ad easily to any type of mobile advertisement campaign without any coding workforce in minutes.

Playable Game ads have lot of different place to use. You can use them in mobile ad, in-app, in banner or on social media to boost your lead generation, awareness or in-app sales.

Here are some of the examples we did in the last months:

Playable Game ads on Social 

Bradford Playable Ads

Tifosy, a fan-funding platform for Football clubs (or soccer, if you’re so inclined), designed a game ad that would not just appeal to but also actively engage Facebook football fans to deliver more than just a Facebook ad but rather an experience that challenged fans based on their very hobby!

Their goals were; driving website traffic (fundraiser/ donations), increasing user engagement, decreasing CPC and lowering conversion costs. Unsurprisingly, the campaign with the highest performance proved to be the one with an engaging CTA and a prominent play button.  But what’s truly astounding is the margin by which this game ad campaign outperformed the others. They achieved:

  • Decreased CPC (Cost per click) 70% (from £0.63 to £0.19)
  • Increased CTR (Click-through rate) 3,9 times (0.50% to 1.94%)
  • Reached 46% Organic Traffic by Game Ads (£0.06 cost-per-play)

Playable Game ads on Mobile

Paramount Playable Ads

Our customer, Paramount, needed to create a game that will be part of their movie Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse’s DVD and Blu-Ray online marketing campaign in the Netherlands. By using Game Ads, they were able to breathe life into the static banner ad format and deliver a pioneering interactive “shoot ‘em up” game to Paramount that made the movie’s (MRAID) ad a whole lot more exciting and more importantly, unexpected! The campaign performed:

  • Reached 1,500,000 impression
  • 35% Better CTR than a Classic Banner Ad
  • 8x More Time Spent on Game Ads

Playable Game ads in App

Burger King Playable Ads

Product promotion “The Angriest Whopper” Burger King and their advertising agency setup München were looking for a new way to engage with their audience and get some additional traffic to their restaurants. The solution was a fast and casual game built on our innovative Game Ad Platform and integrated into Burger King’s existing mobile app. The principle of the game is simple yet addictive: the player is challenged to collect 20 Jalapeños in under 20 seconds in order to unlock an exclusive discount coupon redeemable at the Burger King restaurants. Results after just 14 days of the campaign were stunning:

  • 336,700  Games Played
  • 7,866,146  Jalapeños Collected
  • 40,25% Average CTR
  • 135,883  Coupons Won
  • 0 (Zero) Media Budget Spent

Playable Game ads in Social Media

Holi Festival Playable Ads

Holi Festival of Colors brings their users a fun way to experience the festival’s excitement on their mobile devices and to get ticket discounts prior to the big event. The aim of the pre-sale campaign was to generate more buzz around the festival through social media shares. This was achieved via the game’s genius mechanisms. Users played a very Holi-festival-like game (which you can play too, below) and depending on their score, they were able to receive rebates of up to 4 EUR off the festival entrance price.

The two-part campaign, consisted of an after-sale Game Ad as well, here the players had a chance to win extra “color sandbags” at the festival. The online Game Ad translated into real world perks. This campaign was targeting people who have already bought tickets on the shop right after payment. In order to win the extra sandbags, users had to share their score of the addictive game on Facebook, which once again drummed up the hype, creating a fun and engaging and more importantly unexpected marketing campaign that was every bit as fun as the festival itself.

And it performed:

  • 43% of players hit to share button
  • 22% CTR to CTA Button

At this point, it’s hardly a secret that game ads are the future of advertising and increasing audience engagement. But the main lesson showcased in these campaigns is the inherent importance of wording your call-to-action to stretch the mileage of your Gamewheel ad campaigns. It’s all about putting people in the right mindset to play a game. Click here to start your next game campaign in 5 minutes!

Also Gamewheel just launched new partnership program. If you want to be a partner with us, please contact us!

A Mixed-Reality Game Experience for Burger King: Halloween Game!

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Trick or Treat?

Our latest  campaign of Burger King for Halloween 2016 is just released! Believe us it is scary, spicy and yummy! To play the game is simple, but the whole experience is unique. You can find the game within Burger King app and start playing it by downloading the Burger King app here.

The challenge: Burger King released three special Halloween Whopper editions. We had to create a gamified story-lined mobile campaign to engage with target audience, increase sales and generate leads. In addition, the campaign had to be linked with social media influencers that would offer some hints for the game.  Special discount coupons and a mind blowing secret event had also to be part of the creative gamified content. Tough brief, but one of a kind “mixed-reality game experience” by Gamewheel SaaS tool and gamification platform!

Well, if you really want to know the way, keep reading, as we are definitely going to make you say…Whoohh!

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The game: Burger King Halloween game is a classic skill, in-app game and is based on three easy steps that the player should follow: Scan –Play- Win. Three different game scenarios with different challenges and mechanics are applied on the game.  The player controls a mummy who must collect as many coins as possible and finally reach the exit to the next Burger King restaurant. Each of the 3 levels are set in different environments: “Underworld”, “Red Forest of Horror” and “Black Haunted House”.

burger-king-halloween-1
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Scan: Every Whopper comes with a unique QR code that the player can scan in Burger King app to start the “Halloween Let’s Play” game.

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burgerking_halloween_gameredlevelscan
burgerking_halloween_gameredlevelunlocked

Play: The levels must be played in sequence, starting with the Entry Level and then moving onto the Red and Black.

Win: Players of all levels win discount coupons for Burger King products. In addition, after the completion of Burger King’s special form they can win 1 out of 50 double tickets for a secret event that takes place on October 29th.  The concept of the event will combine elements of the game in 4D and will be a lifetime experience for the 50  people that are lucky enough to receive a double invitation.

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Bonus Ember- codes: In order to trigger more excitement about the Halloween in-app game, 1000 magic ember-codes have been created that when scanned, will immediately unlock all levels of the game. These ember-codes will be distributed via key persons hidden in secret locations in Berlin, München, Köln, Hamburg, Leipzig, Wiesbaden and Hannover. So keep your eyes open and spot these hidden treasures that can be scanned and used up to 100 times!

So, are you ready to #GamifyYourself in this Halloween Burger King Game?

Lessons from dmexco 2016 – by Gamewheel CCO, Olcayto Cengiz

What I Learned in dmexco 2016

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This year I was at dmexco (Digital Marketing Exposition & Conference) 2016 as an exhibitor first time in my life with Gamewheel. It was quite an experience to be there as an exhibitor but not as a visitor. But I didn’t just sit and wait, instead spent my time with collecting some knowledge and here are my learnings from dmexco.

Exhibitor vs. Visitor

First things first. Being an exhibitor is far more exhausting. Spending the 2 days in a row from early morning till the late night is something that requires energy.Being a visitor can be fun and more comfortable but being an exhibitor gives you the chance to discover all the halls and booths without crowd.It is hard to make new friendships if you are a visitor. But if you are an exhibitor, you are having so many “BFF”s for 2 days 🙂

Pure Business

This years motto was “Pure Business”. And at the end of 2 days, I want to shake hands of the fella who came up with this phrase because it was totally bullseye. dmexco was full of business.

It was all about experience. VR and AR were the sexy topics but the real issue were PaaS and SaaS providers.

Seems that ad blocking and the need to find a way around this resulted as the birth of so many startups with the claim of “finding a new and unique innovative way” solutions which were, to be honest, almost identical.

Cloud was another big player. So many cloud companies came up with offerings like a dozen different types of packages.

Where the Frak are Creative Agencies?!

It was a big shock for me to see -or maybe I should say not to see- none of the digital creative agencies in dmexco. Or worse, none of any advertising agencies. There was a lounge for ad agencies, called as “Agency Lounge”, that was it. HAVAS was the overweighting company in the lounge, but that was it.

Lounge for Agencies.

Dentsu was there and they acted more likely as the media agency but their message was to the point.

Sum of dmexco, sum of future

Only Digitas LBi was holding the doors as a “Marketing Agency” with creativity and media assets.

Meanwhile there were like DOZENS of media agencies, and the “Big Guys” were there, embracing the digital era.

More surprisingly, the “usual suspects” were there, as expected, but they were acting as a “media platform” instead of a search engine or social networking platform. Yes, Facebook, Google, Twitter, Yahoo, Bing, ViceSpotify, Tumblr etc. Everyone was there. And they were positioning themselves like “media agencies” not any type of social platform. Even Adobe! They were there to show that they are the best friend of media agencies.

“Usual Suspects”





Big bosses were there; WPP, Publicis. But their creative and advertising branches were nowhere around. Imagine a conference where one of the opening talk is “Sir Martin Sorrell of WPP in a conversation with Jack Dorsey of Twitter” and none of the WPP agencies -despite media agencies- were there.

There was only 1 other gamifying ad company at the whole dmexco and it was not even a platform like us. Our approach with Gamewheel Creatorhad a magnetic effect on the visitors because there were no really creativity. I mean, of course there were creativity all around but not in a visual way. Mostly solution based. When we put on something which combines solution AND creativity, it was a blast. That gave me more hope about our future, we really may lead the way.



#GamifyYourself

So the results,

Yes this is me and this is my “The Results” shot.

What I learned from this view is, if it will go like this, future is going to be written by media agencies, service providers and solution partners. This may sound boring and yes I know it is very nice to say that creativity is sexy, but to be honest business is grey suit, not the red night dress.

Every company trying to reserve a place in the future must reposition themselves and embrace the new way we are leading.

Mad Men era was good, but now we are entering the Mad Code era.

Game Ads – The Next Big Thing After Video Ads?

We’ve already released a few articles about leveraging games in advertising, marketing and business to win the bidding optimization wars or to find the product market fit in case of startups. Today, we’ll focus on some new thoughts inspired by SXSW.

Gamewheel Insights from SXSW

In 2016, Gamewheel joined South By Southwest® (SXSW®) Conference & Festivals in Austin for the first time as part of the Berlin startup delegation, and the trip could not have been more inspiring. Little thanks to our #PartnerInCrime Openers for making this trip happen.

With over 72,000 registrants and artists in attendance, SXSW is one of the most effective channels for bridging technology, creative, media and advertising spaces. This year’s conference was even more special because it marked SXSW’s 30th anniversary. To commemorate this major milestone – both the president of the United States as well as the First Lady joined the conference! This officially means that Gamewheel’s CEO presented alongside keynote speakers like Barack and Michel Obama, albeit not the same event, nonetheless we couldn’t be prouder! The Obama’s presence at the conference showcases the rising importance of the tech world in politics. Behind all the media attention focused at the prominent guests, SXSW once again offered a plethora of fresh insights that we cannot wait to share.

Today, we’d like to focus on the discussion we had during the panel “How All Brands Can Win with Game Advertising” run by Susan Borst from IAB. The panel’s leading guests, Michael Flamberg (Nielsen), Kym Nelson (Twich) and Peter Jonas (Facebook), demonstrate the importance and relevance of gamification in advertising and the rise of games as a default part of the marketing mix. Showtime’s Game Ad for their new show Roadies, which was prominently placed into the SXSW conference app, further highlights gamification’s rise and predominance in the marketing world.

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Why Using Games in Advertising Now?

YouTubers have paved the way for video ads and contributed to the ad industries phenomenal growth over the past years. Recently, video ads have also become one of the top priorities of Facebook and contributed significantly to the mobile ad revenue growth in 2015. In fact, Digital Video format is the only growing advertising format besides mobile according to recent IAB Industry Report 2015:

Screen Shot 2016-04-03 at 10.10.57 PM

The rise of mobile ads and Messaging apps and platforms, which are now already bigger than social networks according to Business Insider, has created a demand for an even more interactive and flexible ad format. We call this next generation of online marketing: Game Ads.

Game Ads are short interactions, with durations similar to Video Ads, that boast even higher engagement rates and deeper insights into user engagement. As there is no auto-play feature, a user has to interact with the Game Ad to finish it, resulting in higher brand value per session.

Why should you start caring about games now ? Game play dynamics have changed significantly over the past few years due to new technology, plus social/mobile adoption. With impressive scale and engagement, gaming is a powerful form of digital media consumption that marketers can no longer continue to ignore. The evidence is clear: demographics for games are more inclusive than ever with time spent playing growing at an unprecedented rate. (Source SXSW panel description)

Putting this in numbers – 79% of people aged between 18-44 have their smartphones with them 22 hours a day, seven days a week. More than 62% of adults and 85% of teens play mobile games. The staggering statistics don’t stop there, as AdAge recently pointed out , games are no longer a man’s domain – 49% of game players on mobile devices are women according to the latest data shared by Nielsen. So, let’s dive right into how to incorporate games into your advertising strategy.

Typical Scenarios of Games in Advertising

We’d like to provide our view on the typical scenarios of leveraging games in advertising based on our team’s expansive experience in creating games, building gaming studios and products, like the AR/VR focused studio Toywheel and our SaaS game builder, Gamewheel.

In the ecosystem advertising report by IAB, 3 types of game advertising have been highlighted. We’d like to extend this classification by a new game usage scenario number 4 – Game Ads.

1. Around Game Ads – This game advertising type includes game sponsorship of display units around the game. Display or digital video ads are shown while the game loads or can show during natural breaks in gameplay, such as between levels (“inter-level”,) or between rounds of play (Source IAB)

in-game2. In-Game Ads – Display ads within the game and ads triggered based on experience within the game, integrated within the game environment. There are two primary types:

  • Static or dynamically served in-game ads that are integrated into the game environment
  • Value Exchange is a model that is gaining popularity with marketers, developers, and gamers. These ads allow players to engage with an ad in exchange for in-game content and rewards, such as a new game level, in-game currency, branded items, etc. (Source IAB)

around-game-ads

3. Custom Branded Games (aka Advergames) – These are custom-made games specifically designed around a brand and act as de-facto longer format ads, cleverly blending brand messaging with a fun and interactive gaming experience to achieve campaign objectives. (Source IAB)

custom-branded

4. Game Ads – Shorter version of Advergames with 15-60 seconds game play, which are “not trying to compete with full game experience”, but are running as part of an Ad campaign eg. in social media or in-app. We refer to Game Ads as also “mini-games”, “interactions” or “toys”. Those are mostly being used as part of brand engagement or content marketing campaigns to introduce a new brand/or new product, raise awareness or indirectly/directly explain a new specific feature or topic through simple game mechanics.

GAME-Ads

How is the Game Ad Campaign Typically Designed

Typical Game Ad Campaign consists of three main elements as we have outlined in our detailed guide, which you can find here:

  • Ad
  • Mini-Game
  • Destination page

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Typically, Game Ads are rewarded instantly after the game-play through the destination module, which could be a landing page or something more advanced. Different game outcomes, could be linked to different rewards, which is gamifying the advertising experience. Therefore, on top of the added benefit of high ad engagement rates and times, marketers also gain valuable insights through measurable actions, often allowing advertisers to capture or enrich lead / customer data:

  • Purchase intent – e.g., Play and visit the special offer site
  • A social share – e.g., Play and share your “pride/ achievement” on Facebook
  • Participate in a poll – e.g., Play and answer a poll
  • Coupon – e.g., Play and download a coupon
  • App Install – e.g., Play and install an app
  • Event – e.g. Play and sign-up for an event
  • Provide email – e.g. Play and download content marketing piece
  • Custom integration – e.g. Play and connect with custom service / API

With the rise of messaging platforms, leveraging such engaging and easily “personalizable” advertising formats, such as Game Ads is key to gaining more marketing traction. In fact, it creates a completely new use case: Game Ads could be placed inside of messaging groups, using multi-player or leaderboard game mechanics. Moreover, those games are perfectly suited to work in combination with chatbots like virtual currency chatbot known from Kik (see screenshot below) and other messaging apps.

We expect a lot of new features around the combination of Ad Games and Messaging platforms to be introduced during the f8 conference in April 12/13 in San Francisco, especially after the degree with which the secret basketball game went viral right after the SXSW Interactive conference.

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Why Game Ads Are Significantly Less Risky Than Advergames

Game production costs have steadily declined over the last few decades, yet a significant budget and high-associated risk are still an inherent part of building any new game, even if it is a relatively small Advergame.

The decline in production costs has been fueled by the rise of the indie games industry, which is powered by new game engines like Unity, and mobile ecosystems like Apple’s App Store. Still, most of the indie game studios can’t actually make a living out of their work. If you look closely at successful indie game titles like Monument Valley, you’d be surprised by just how much of their budget goes into production. According to Monument Valley founders, they spent $1.4 million for the eight-person team to create the game.

Our team gets a lot of requests every day to evaluate game projects for all 4 scenarios described above, thus we’ve created this simple table to provide you with our typical budget estimates for the game content. Hopefully, this provides you with a “gut feel” for future decisions.

Game Scenario Gameplay Budget types ($) Game types
Game Ads – new! 15-60 seconds (repeatable) 0 – Freemium, SaaS

1-10K – Indie

>10K – Regular

Simple casual, retro or mobile games, maximum of one level
Advergames >1 minute 10-25K – Indie

25-50K – Regular

>50K – Major

Simple casual, retro or mobile games, one or several levels
Full-size games required by both In-Game Ads and Around-Game Ads >10 minutes 50K-250K – Indie

250K-1M – Regular

>1M – Major

Full-size, more complex, unique game types

Given the typically tiny budgets for Games in the advertising arena (see the overview table above), lots of agencies and indie game studios end up “reskinning” popular games or just copying exciting successful game mechanics with slight variation to match the brand brief campaign. Though, in this case most of the studios underestimate the cost and complexity of such “presumably small changes” and their implications to the game design & testing. It’s no surprise that most of those projects are notorious for being risky and not hugely successful.

This is why we have created the platform Gamewheel, which offers a library of popular game types, that can be fully branded and edited online using the simple self-service wizard. Each Game Ad can be connected with a reward through a customizable CTA destination leading to a landing page after the game. If you would like to learn more, here is a full guide how to build an Ad Game campaign without any fixed costs using Gamewheel.

Besides zero development & test efforts, as well almost instant production time, another advantage of the Gamewheel approach is the ability to test multiple versions of game types using Dynamic Creative Optimization (DCO) platforms like AdGibbon or social media ad managers like Facebook at no additional cost.

We’ll be detailing how to A/B or split-test an Ad Game campaign in the future on our blog as well as discussing the various game types available on the Gamewheel platform and what ad campaigns they’re best suited for. We’re also tirelessly working on a few case studies combining Game Ads and Messaging platforms to demonstrate the power of this new advertising terrain. You can find a first dozen here already.

So, don’t forget to signup for a free Gamewheel account and to visit our blog regularly for all the latest updates and developments both at Gamewheel and within the online ad industry.

3 Use Cases How Brands Leverage Gamification in Marketing

In the previous article “Trends for mobile advertising” we’ve already talked about how games can be leveraged to strengthen the relationship between the brand and the customer. Today, we’d like to have a look at a different use case for game technics – Gamification in marketing or gamified advertising.

gamification

Gamification leads to better customer engagement and loyalty

What is Gamification?

The goal of Gamification is to increase the probability that a person repeats desired steps, providing and opportunity to influence humans behavior through games. Essential game elements often used in the Gamification include scoring systems, ranking lists, virtual goods and small incentives. Gamification has become increasingly popular in marketing, education and other industry sectors.

Current research shows that Gamification increases customer commitment and loyalty, as well as the motivation of employees. If implemented correctly, it can have a high return on investment for companies (Dr. Städtgen, Gamification and Motivation, 2015). Today, we’d like to have a look at three use cases of how brands have leveraged Gamification in their marketing. But before we go into the individual cases, let’s have a quick look at the psychological background of why Gamification works.

Psychology of Gamification – Introducing the Prospect Theory

Why does Gamification work? You can find a hint in the Prospect Theory introduced by Kahnemann and Tversky. It shows that small incentives enable people to take an extra effort to do things that they otherwise would not.

The Prospect Theory is a behavioral economic theory that describes the way people choose probabilisticalternatives that involve risk — where the probabilities of outcomes are known. People take an effort because of their intrinsic motivation (brand commitment maybe too) in situations where they expect a reward. In other terms, people’s behaviors are being influenced by Gamification elements mentioned above, which can have a very small cost / investment for the brand.

(More information about Prospect Theory)

Gamification in marketing

Case Study 1: Nike

Nike+Fuel is a personalized app. This app demonstrates how a brand can stay connected with its customers through Gamification elements.

The goal of this project was to keep in contact with customers to gather information about them. Nike used Gamification as a way to give an incentive while customers were running and tracking their activity. Runners competed against others and collected their latest achievements and overall performances. Nike collected personal data about users which were valuable for content marketing. Furthermore, the app is linked to social media so users could compare performances from all over the world. After completing different levels customers are rewarded with trophies and badges, which in psychology science is called a positive intensifier. Nike increases its brand presence when customers share their training results on social media.

Impact

Nike gathered a high amount of data over a long period. This information can be used for personalized services and lead to an increase in productivity of R&D and digital marketing. At the same time, the game boosts the loyalty of the customer.

(Detailed Case study)

Case Study 2: Urban Sport Club

Urban Sports Club Gamification

Urban Sports Club Gamification

Gamewheel created a rock climbing themed game for Urban Sports Club. The company, a fitness flat rate, used a game in a lead generation campaign.

In this game theme, the user has to climb as high as they can to get a chance to win a 3 month contract for free. It’s a great way to for Urban Sports Club to gather new potential customer leads, engage their community in a very authentic way, present their value proposition differently and have the opportunity to create a special relationship with customers.

Impact

The majority of users replayed the game over 3 times, which shows a very high level of engagement. Urban Sports Club was able to capture the players data who participated in the competition in the leaderboard and add them to the existing vivid club community. Summarizing, games can offer new ways to power up communities and create a sense of natural & fun competition to boost engagement and capture new potential leads.

Detailed case study.

Case Study 3: Target

Target becomes Santa’s helper with ‘Holiday Wish’ app. Target developed a 3D animated game experience allowing kids to create Christmas wish lists and send them to Santa. The US retail giant generated nearly 75,000 downloads of the app.

Impact

Though the app was released in limited distribution for its initial launch, the data collected from users proved that it was a success. Over 100,000 wish lists were created, as well as 9,200 new Target.com accounts.

61% percent of users used the app multiple times a week, including 31 percent who used the app multiple times per day, generating over a million page visits to Target.com via the app. The average wish list was comprised of about 30 items and had an average value of $1,500.

Over the course of six weeks from app launch to the close of the holiday season, nearly 1.7 million total items were added to Target guest wish lists, for a total sales potential of $92.3 million.

(Detailed Case study)